Cavalleria Rusticana – May 2012

Marcello Giordani displays a voice which expands in the high notes, powerful and clarion at the same time, which allows him to do justice to this exposed role. (Translated from the French)

Classique-Info – April 27, 2012

The appeal to mamma is probably the most effective moment of the opera: Marcello Giordani infuses his singing with a certain pathos that remains in line with the character.  His diction is perfect, his enunciation is very clear. (Translated from the French)

Res Musica – April 20, 2012

Aida – January 2012

As is his dramatic style, the Sicilian tenor effectively underplayed the somewhat stolid role of Radames but rose to the vocal challenges superbly. Giordani’s voice soared thrillingly over the massed ensembles of Act 2 and he brought an emotional depth and highly nuanced vocalism to his late scene with Amneris and the final duet.

Chicago Classical Review – January 22, 2012

Carmen – Royal Opera House Muskat, Oman – December 2011

“The role of Don José was sung by Marcello Giordani. His beautiful voice was smooth and clear with a wide range, but what was more noticeable was his strength as an actor. His Don José was weak and incapable of resisting a captivating woman. He let his emotions get the best of himself, and when he lost control, he lashed out, usually with a knife. Giordani seemed tormented and frustrated, a perfect Don José!”
– “Oman Time”, 20 December 2011

Pagliacci – Gran Teatre de Liceu, Barcelona – April 2011

“Marcello Giordani tackles the double role of Turiddu and Canio with a voice that … possesses gleaming high notes which do not contrast with a sound always under control, getting better and better with an intelligent measuring of strength. His refusal of any expressive vulgarity or tearful effects matches the musical direction of Daniele Callegari…” (Translated from Spanish)

– El Punt AVUI – April 4, 2011

“Marcello Giordani, as Canio,… offered a wonderful and strong “Recitar!…Vesti la giubba” and a thrilling “No! Pagliaccio non son.”

Lola Vicente, ConcertoNet.com – April 2011

Cavalleria Rusticana – Gran Teatre de Liceu, Barcelona – April 2011

“Marcello Giordani tackles the double role of Turiddu and Canio with a voice that … possesses gleaming high notes which do not contrast with a sound always under control, getting better and better with an intelligent measuring of strength. His refusal of any expressive vulgarity or tearful effects matches the musical direction of Daniele Callegari…” (Translated from Spanish)

– El Punt AVUI – April 4, 2011

“Marcello Giordani was an outstanding Turiddu, one of the very best around today.”

– Seen and Heard International – April 19, 2011

La Fanciulla del West – Lyric Opera of Chicago – January 2011

“It was almost surreal to see Giordani as the quintessential Italian tenor embody this bandito in California, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. His voice was clear and effortless, and his long high note in the second act felt almost weightless.”
– Evan Kuchar, Chicago Now – February 5, 2011

“When Marcello Giordani made his entrance as Ramerrez, he immediately commanded attention with his stage presence and powerful voice. Sometimes his volume was out of balance, which could be attributed to the blocking, but this is a role he does well.”
– James L. Zychowicz, Seen and Heard International – January 22, 2011

“His assets included the right physique du rôle — he’s tall and handsome — along with a hefty, Italianate tenor boasting a clarion top. His passionately sung ‘Ch’ella mi creda’, the closest thing to a bona fide tenor aria in this opera, earned its big ovation.”
– John von Rhein, Chicago Tribune – January 23, 2011

“Marcello Giordani… remains in supreme vocal estate. The Sicilian tenor’s big, Italianate voice seems tailor-made for Minnie’s reprobate lover Ramerrez…. his clarion top C’s were as powerful as they were seemingly effortless, ringing through the vast house. Giordani’s impassioned yet tender Ch’ella mi creda was the highlight of the evening, and dramatically, Giordani did all that was required while underplaying the role of the guilt-stricken bandit effectively.”
– Lawrence A. Johnson, Chicago Classical Review – Jan 23, 2011

La Fanciulla del West – Metropolitan Opera – December 2010

“Marcello Giordani produced an Italianate sound with ringing high notes. He delivered a standout rendition of the aria ‘Ch’ella mi creda libero e lontano’ in Act 3.”
– Barry Bassis, The Epoch Times – January 24, 2011

“The role of Dick Johnson provided ample opportunity to Marcello Giordani to show off his large, easy, ringing top as he sang with unforced power. Subtle burnished colors and a lyrical quality in his middle voice created an air of tenderness and genuine concern for Minnie, especially in the second act.”
– Arlene Judith Klotzko – ConcertoNet.com – December 2010

“[Marcello Giordani] was in excellent form in a role that suits his voice well. His top notes were solid and he sang with a sweetness of tone that made Minnie’s attraction to Johnson quite credible. He gave an impassioned and moving rendition of ‘Ch’ella mi creda libero e lontano’ in Act Three, the opera’s most notable aria.”
– David M. Rice, The Classical Source – January10, 2011

“…Marcello Giordani’s Dick Johnson, an outlaw whose encounter with Minnie both humanizes him and converts him from his renegade criminality, was very impressive and consistent, with an exciting top and a vocal delivery blessed with a variety of color and expression.”
The Opera Tattler – December 16, 2010

“Marcello Giordani flashes endlessly plangent top tones as ardent Dick Johnson (call it squillo)…”
– Martin Bernheimer, Financial Times – December 9, 2010

“The tenor Marcello Giordani brings his beefy, ardent Italianate voice to the role of Ramerrez, alias Dick Johnson…. The role of Johnson gives him ample opportunities to luxuriate in tenorial top notes and unleash impassioned phrases.”
– Anthony Tommasini, New York Times – December 7, 2010

“[Giordani] was in fine form as Johnson, the former bandit redeemed by Minnie’s love. His ‘Ch’ella mi creda libero e lontano’ was a highlight of the evening, along with the lovers walking off to ‘Addio, mia California!'”
– Ronald Blum, Associates Press – December 11, 2011

Aida – San Francisco Opera – September 2010

After the prelude, the opera’s most famous hit tune, “Celeste Aida” (Radiant Aida) arrives quickly and Giordani dispatches it with aplomb, giving the final high B-flat a enough polish to be convincing in the mastery of it. In lesser hands than Giordano’s, it often spells real trouble for the singers. Giordano is a large man and gives heft to the scene in which he is named to lead the army to conquer the invading Ethiopians. He looks the part, definitely, a sort of latter-day Victor Mature.
– Richard Bammer, The Reporter – September 14, 2010

Giordani’s tenor is a searing lirico spinto, delivered with tremendous power and an almost uncontainable energy. I found myself cursing Verdi for not giving Radames more set pieces.
– Michael Vaughn, The Opera Critic, September 16, 2010

His clarion tone cut through the massed ensembles of Act 2, and he sang with dramatic frisson and consistently rich, heroic tone. The Sicilian tenor is also one of our finest actors and his ease on stage and natural reactions made a believable tragic figure in an opera that can have a stiff, pageant-like quality.
– Lawrence A. Johnson, The Classical Review, September 25, 2010

Marcello Giordani gave his Radames a bright tone, and the puissance of his timbre was often overwhelming and suited to the impetuous Egyptian leader… He did offer wonderful moments of intense drama, giving his best during the recitativi.
– Marina Romani, Musical Criticism.com – September 20, 2010

…with his open powerful sound [Marcello Giordani] was more thrilling than any other Pollione of the past years. (Translated from the German)
– Robert Braunmüller, Abendzeitung, August 10, 2010

Norma – Salzburg Festival – August 2010

Marcello Giordani lent his Pollione a powerful and penetrating tenor with refined melodious sound… (Translated from the German)
OÖNachrichten, August 11, 2010

…with his open powerful sound [Marcello Giordani] was more thrilling than any other Pollione of the past years. (Translated from the German)
– Robert Braunmüller, Abendzeitung, August 10, 2010